Sunday Religion Roundup

This week in religion:

Louie Giglio, who was scheduled to give the benediction at Obama’s inauguration, withdrew under fire from anti-gay remarks he made in the mid-1990’s. People have a lot to say about it. Christians can’t stop talking about how oppressed they are. None of them see the irony, apparently. Namely Sarah Posner at RD has a good analysis of the whole bruhaha. And I had something to say about it as well.

People who identify as “spiritual, but not religious” have a higher rate of mental illness. Soon to be a talking point at a church near you!Perhaps mental illness and a dissatisfaction with big religion go hand in hand, rather than spirituality causing mental illness? That won’t sound as good on the pulpit, though.

The number of Americans who believe homosexuality is a sin dropped seven percent in the last year alone.

A newly released email in the case of Mohamed Mohamud, who tried to detonate a bomb at the Portland Christmas tree lighting, revealed that the FBI originally identified him as an “ideal candidate” to approach. No word on what exactly he was an “ideal candidate” for, but this only lends credence to the notion that Mohamed Mohamud was entrapped. Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, one of my favorite professors from my time at Reed and overall genius and badass, did an excellent analysis of this a couple years ago.

Chris Hedges gives an interview about his book that he did with Joe Sacco, Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt over at RD. If you love a strange mix of diatribes and brilliant graphic journalism, it’s a great book for you.

“Booyah, Mohammed Mursi!” Joshua Stacher writes for the Middle East Report about how kids in Egypt are internalizing lessons from the Arab Spring.

The nomination of Zero Dark Thirty for an Academy Award raised profound questions about the lessons movies teach us – namely, how they might be shaping our national conversation about torture in negative ways. Can religion play a role in ending torture?

Au Revoir,

Rob

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